Tiny white worms

Discussion in 'Diseases' started by Soundline, Oct 8, 2017.

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  1. Soundline
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    Soundline Active Member

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    K soooooo long story short my 20 gallon planted tank broke last night, so we rushed all the livestock into the new 46. So I decided to run that tanks filters as well to help reduce the possible cycle. When I turned it on a rush of tiny white worms rushed out of the filter the fish started eating them and the Intake sucked them all in really fast. They are like as thick as a piece of thick thread and about a little less then half an inch.

    I'm assuming they came from the wood cause I've never sent them and then I see them shortly after the wood was put in. The wood from that tank came from the beach at ocean shores.

    What are they and how do I get rid of them?

    I noticed a blue gourami is bloated and sitting at the bottom of the tank u till I do a water change and he is fine for the day.
     
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  3. clownie
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    clownie Well-Known Member

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    From algone web site "Noticing small white worms the size of a few millimeters crawling along the glass are either flat or roundworms. Flat appearances are planaria (flatworms) and the more thin and wiggly ones are nematodes (roundworms). Both of them do not exceed 4-5 millimeters. Both types are harmless to fish and thrive on excessive waste in the water column."
     
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  4. VickiK
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    VickiK Well-Known Member

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    Excessive waste! In my 35G, I have this really big, coarse black gravel PLUS its planted VERY LUSHLY so it's not like you can get in there and really go to town with the aqua-vac thing. I do bi-weekly water changes - 25-30% - and rinse the HOB filter (rated for a 75G tank) regularly. It's stocked with two giant (now they're big - they started out the size of a quarter) Koi Angels, 1 African Leaf Fish, 1 Rosy Barb, 4 Giant Danios, 1 Bristlenose 5", and 1 SAE I inherited from @julzhull. (One died and his brother is in with the Texas Red Cichlid) My water looks great and I have live plants growing out of the top of this tank. When do you say, "time to break it down and start over"? And if you do this, do you not completely start over but --- how do you really clean a seasoned tank such as this -- which clearly has too much poo in it due to the worms arrival --- without "starting over"? Does that make sense?

    The 10 GAL I have in the kitchen, has been running continuously since 2006 or something. Water quality and parameters are good -- but I know that gravel is full of GOO. It has to be. I gravel vac for sure - but you can't get everything. There are floating live plants in there and a school of Porkchop Rasboras and a few Endlers that won't let me catch them. There's also one of those Aquatic Frogs who has been in there for a good three years. Do you wait until everything dies to FLIP IT or what?

    I'm having a cleaning crisis I guess. lol

    Any and all advise embraced enthusiastically.
     
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  5. clownie
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    clownie Well-Known Member

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    Vicky.....for me, if there isn't any fish deaths I would leave it be. Actually the worms are doing you a favor! thy clean up some of the excess waste and provide a healthy snack for your fishes! I have had tanks set up for 10 years without a major cleaning an all was fine.
     
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  6. FishBeast
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    FishBeast Well-Known Member Contributing Member Level III

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    I would say leave it alone. I would think muck in the substrate surely is being used by the plants in some way. Don’t stress about the deep clean too much. You may try feeding once only every other day for a week or two and/or performing larger water changes of 50 to 80% every 3-4 days.
     

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